Interenational Affairs Department, Telecommunications Bureau MIC Communications News Vol.17 No.4 June 9,2006 Biweekly Newsletter of the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications(MIC), Japan

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Japan-France Joint Statement Signed on Exchange of Human Resources in the Field of Information and Communications Technologies
-- Further Promotion of Cooperation between Japan and France in ICT Field --

On May 5, 2006, in Paris, France, Rep. FURUYA Noriko, Parliamentary Secretary for Internal Affairs and Communications, Japan, held a meeting with Director General Luc ROUSSEAU, General Directorate for Enterprise of the Ministry of Economy, Finance and Industry (MINEFI), France, with a purpose of promoting cooperation in the ICT field based upon the Declaration for the new Japan-French partnership.

At the meeting, Parliamentary Secretary FURUYA and Director General ROUSSEAU adopted and signed the "Joint Statement on Exchange of Human Resources in the Field of Information and Communications Technologies" and the "Joint Statement between France and Japan, Concerning Cooperation in the Field of Anti-spam Policies and Strategies."

With respect to the strengthened cooperation between the two countries concerning exchange of human resources in the ICT field, MIC and the French Ministry of Economy, Finance and Industry signed the "Joint Statement on Human Resources Exchange."

With regard to the promotion of cooperation between the two countries concerning anti-spam policies and strategies, MIC and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (the Japanese side) and the General Directorate for Enterprise of MINEFI and the Media Development Department (Prime Minister's Office) (the French side) signed the "Joint Statement on Anti-spam," describing information exchanges and holding of an international forum for collaboration on anti-spam policies and strategies among others.

The promotion of cooperation in the ICT field was prescribed under the Declaration for the new Japan-French partnership decided by H.E. Mr. Jacques CHIRAC, the President of France, and H.E. Mr. KOIZUMI Junichiro, the Prime Minister of Japan on March 27, 2005, in Tokyo, Japan. This "Joint Statement on Human Resources Exchange" as part of the "Declaration for the new Japan-French partnership" was proposed at the "10th Japan-France Policy Consultation on ICT" held in Paris, France, in February 2006, between MIC and the French MINEFI.

In addition to the promotion of cooperation between the two nations based upon those Joint Statements, MIC will continue working on bilateral and multilateral cooperation in the ICT field for strengthening international collaborative ties.


Joint Statement on Exchange of Human Resources in the Field of Information and Communications Technologies Between the Ministry of Economy, Finance and Industry, France, and the Ministry of Internal affairs and Communications, Japan

The Ministry of Economy, Finance and Industry, France, and the Ministry of Internal affairs and Communications, Japan (hereinafter referred to as "the Ministries")

Acknowledging that the globalization of Information and Communications Technologies (hereinafter referred to as "ICT"), which holds the key to further in the development of societies in France and Japan, and that ICT is making rapid inroads and, especially, that standardization is needed on a worldwide scale;

Considering that the two countries agreed to develop actively the partnership in the field of ICT under the Declaration for the new France - Japan partnership decided by H.E. Mr. Jacques CHIRAC, the President of France, and H.E. Mr. Junichiro KOIZUMI, the Prime Minister of Japan on March 27, 2005.

Recognizing that in the field of R&D several memorandums of understanding on partnership were decided between the GET (Groupe des écoles des telecommunications, France) and the NICT (National Institute of Information & Communications Technology, Japan) on June 27, 2005, and between the INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique) and the NICT and on June 21, 2005, and that these memorandums are making a trend toward closer co-operation in the field of ICT between France and Japan, and

Having confirmed, especially, the importance of the exchange of human resources for the future development of ICT at the 10th France-Japan Policy Consultation on ICT in Paris on February 1, 2006.

Have shared the following views:
a) In order to strengthen co-operative activities in the area of human resources in the field of ICT, the Ministries will take the initiative to;
i) Encourage the regular exchange of human resources in the field of ICT;
ii) Establish, especially, a scheme of periodic exchange of technical experts in the field of ICT between France and Japan from the year 2007, paying attention to the memorandums of understanding mentioned above;
b) The Ministries will promote co-operation in the field of ICT between France and Japan by providing information concerning the ICT industries and academia, for example, the holding of conferences, seminars, etc.

All cooperative activities under this Joint Statement will be conducted in accordance with the applicable laws and regulations of each country.

All cooperative activities under this Joint Statement will be subject to the availability of funds and resources of the Ministries. The costs of these activities will be shared by the Ministries in a manner to be agreed.

Signed in duplicate in Paris on May 5, 2006, in both French and Japanese, both versions are equally valid.

Joint Statement Between France and Japan, Concerning Cooperation in the Field of Anti-Spam Policies and Strategies

The General Directorate for Enterprise (Ministry of Economy, Finance and Industry), and the Media Development Department (Prime minister's office), France, the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan (hereinafter referred to as "the signed organizations"), have reached the following understanding:

Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), including the Internet, holds the key to further development of the economies in both France and Japan. Spam poses a potential threat to this economic development. It must be made clear that spam has no legitimate role in the French or Japanese e-economy.

The signed organizations see mutual benefit in strengthening friendship and cooperation between the two countries through cooperation concerning anti-spam policies and strategies. The aim is to support international cooperation in and among a variety of organizations such as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the International Telecommunication Union, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the Internet Engineering Task Force, the International Consumer Protection and Enforcement Network, and the Asia-Europe Meeting.

Under this Joint Statement, cooperation in matters of mutual interest will be able to take place through the exchange of ideas, information, personnel, skills and experience and collaborative activities (such as "Signal-spam" and "Spam Blocking Support Project") that will be of benefit to both sides. Because spam has implications for many groups of stakeholders, every effort will be made to ensure that all interested policy, regulatory and enforcement agencies are consulted as appropriate. Particular areas of cooperation will include:
a) Exchanging information about anti-spam activities such as anti-spam policies and strategies, as well as technical and educational solutions to spam, including mobile spam;
b) Encouraging the adoption of effective anti-spam technologies and network management practices by French and Japanese Internet service providers and major business network managers, and further cooperation between government and private sectors;
c) Supporting French and Japanese marketers or bulk email senders in adopting spam-free marketing techniques;
d) Identifying and promoting user practices and behaviours which can effectively control and limit spam and supporting the development of public relations and awareness campaigns for the multi-stakeholders to foster increased adoption of anti-spam practices and behaviours by end users in France and Japan;
e) Cooperating to strengthen anti-spam initiatives being considered in international forum.

The cooperative activities carried out under this Joint Statement will be subject to the availability of funds and resources of the signed organizations.

Signed in duplicate in Paris on May 5, 2006, in both French and Japanese, both versions are equally valid.

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"Communications Usage Trend Survey in 2005" Compiled

MIC has compiled the "Communications Usage Trend Survey" as of the end of CY2005 in order to grasp the usage trends in telecommunications and broadcasting services within households (households and household members), companies (enterprises) and offices (establishments).

The English-language version of the survey results will be posted after necessary arrangements at the "STATISTICS Corner" of MIC's Information and Communications Policy Site:
http://www.soumu.go.jp/joho_tsusin/eng/statistics.html

Highlights of the survey results

The number of Internet users via mobile terminals has been increasing further, surpassing those via personal computers (PCs) for the first time.
With respect to terminals for accessing the Internet by individual users, the number of Internet users via mobile terminals, including cellular telephones, increased by 10.98 million from the end of the previous year (an increase of 18.8 percentage points over the previous year) to 69.23 million, surpassing those via PCs (66.01 million, an estimated figure) for the first time. This shows a further increase in the number of Internet users via mobile terminals.

More than a half of the Internet users (57.0%, or 48.62 million, of the total number [85.29 million], estimated figures) are using both personal computers and mobile terminals.

The number of Internet users subscribing to broadband access networks continues to be on the rise. When looking into the ratio of each broadband network, while the ratio of fiber-optic circuits has been increasing, that of digital subscriber lines, or DSL, recoded a decrease for the first time.
The number of broadband access network users increased by 4.6 million (an increase of 10.8 percentage points compared to the figure as of the end of previous year) to 47.07 million (an estimated figure), showing a continuous increase in the number of broadband users, or reaching 55.2% to the total number of Internet users.

About two-thirds of households have access to the Internet via PCs (65.0%) and 68.1% of corporate Internet users have subscribed to broadband access network services.

With regard to types of broadband circuits to which residential users' PCs are connected, while the usage ratio of fiber-optic circuits grew from 6.1% to 14.8%, that of DSLs decreased from for the first time from 39.2% to 34.2%. The same trend was seen in companies and offices.

Internet users have been continuously increasing.
The number of Internet users who have accessed the Internet in 2005 reached 85.29 million (an estimated figure), increased by 5.81 million (a 7.3 percentage point growth over the previous year). Thanks to the increase, the population coverage ratio of Internet users increased by 4.5 percentage points to 66.8% (an estimated figure).

The digital divide between age groups still exists.
Differences in the usage rates for age groups, annual income groups, gender groups and sizes of cities were narrowed in comparison with those in the previous year. However, the differences in the usage rates for the age groups of their 60s or older and younger age groups are still remarkable (e.g., a difference of 20 percentage points between their 50s and their early 60s).

When comparing the usage rate for cellular telephones with that for PCs, that for cellular telephones is high. The PC usage rates extremely differ by age groups.
The cellular telephone usage rate (71.9%) exceeds the PC usage rate (56.7%) by 15 percentage points, as is seen by age groups. In particular, the cellular telephone usage rate for the age group "ages between 6 through 12" overwhelmingly exceeds the PC usage rate by 37 percentage points.

The cellular telephone usage rates for their 20s through 40s surpass 90%, even for their late 60s exceeds 50%. On the other hand, the PC usage rates for their 20s through 40s exceed 70%, that for their 50s is 55%, and that for their late 60s is 22.7%. With respect to the digital divide by age groups, since skills and knowledge are needed to operate PCs, the older the age group grew, the lower the PC usage rates decline.

Although IP telephony services have been introduced into corporate users, the number of residential IP telephony users has slowed down in the growth rate.
The corporate usage rate for IP telephony services has grown by 11.6 percentage points year on year to 39.4%. On the contrary, the residential usage rate for IP telephony services has slightly increased by 2.3 percentage points to 15.0%, showing a stagnant growth rate lower than that of the year before (an increase of 5.4 percentage points).

The corporate user rate of information and communications networks who take some measures for protecting personal information have grown by 16.7 percentage points over the previous year to 73.2%, indicating that measures for protecting personal information have been taken by corporate users on a swift pace. Of such measures, "improved training at office" recorded the highest rate of 45.7%, followed by "appointment of a chief information officer (CIO)" (41.4%).

Survey outlines

The "Communications Usage Trend Survey," which is composed of the following three sections: "Households/household members," "Companies (enterprises)," and "Offices (establishments)" has been conducted annually since 1990 as a statistical survey authorized by MIC in accordance with the Statistical Report Coordination Law. The survey on "Companies (enterprises)" was conducted in 1993 as the annual survey (except 1994), and "household members" was added in 2001.

  Households Companies (Enterprises) Offices (Establishments)
Survey period As of January 2006
Surveyed area Nationwide Nationwide Nationwide
Object samples surveyed Households (including single households) headed by someone aged 20 or older as of April 1, 2005 Enterprises with more than 100 regular employees excluding the industries of "Agriculture," "Forestry," "Fisheries" and "Mining" as defined in JSIC Establishments with more than 5 regular employees excluding the industries of "Postal services" and "Telecommunications" as defined in JSIC
Number of samples 6,400 3,000 5,600
Effective replies (rate) 3,982 households (12,879 persons) (62.2%) 1,406 (46.9%) 2,821 (50.4%)
Items surveyed Usage trends in information and communications services, rates of ICT equipment possession, etc.
Sampling method Random sampling (Stratified Two-stage Sampling on sizes of cities, towns and villages) Random sampling (Systematic Sampling on regular employee size for each industry) Random sampling (Systematic Sampling on regular employee size for each industry)
Survey method Mail survey (postal service)


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Report on "Survey/Research Concerning Current Status of Organizations That Support SOHOs and Measures for Supporting SOHOs"

In order to contribute to promote such working modes as small office home office (SOHO), MIC has carried out a survey on the current status of organizations that support SOHOs, focusing on the support activities, etc. of such organizations, which are expected to play a vital role in promoting SOHO working modes.

Since job types, etc. of the relevant SOHO service providers vary, activities by organizations in support of SOHOs come in diverse forms, such as exchanges in business information among those providers, training courses, seminars and management of social welfare schemes. Accordingly, organizations that support SOHOs include local public entities, juridical persons for public interest, NPOs and private-sector entities.

The report describes "10 conditions for the success of organizations that support SOHOs" which forms the keystone. MIC will, based upon this report, publish pamphlets and booklets offering case studies for SOHO service providers and organizations that support SOHOs.

Ten conditions for the success of organizations that support SOHOs--basic points for the success of operations carried out by organizations that support SOHOs


<In cases where SOHO support is work-related>

1. Always exchanging contracts when placing an order for work to a SOHO operator
This leads to avoiding trouble with the SOHO operator and reducing risk, and also is related to earning the SOHO operator's trust and improving trust as the organization.

2. Being thorough in managing deadlines, and preparing a troubleshooting strategy in advance
It is necessary to set up a system for managing deadlines and not to make customer worry, not only to share responsibility with the SOHO operator, in order to receive ongoing orders for business.

3. Securing the trust of the SOHO operator, and putting in place a compensation plan
If one secures the trust of the SOHO operator doing the project with regard to the customer placing the order, and furthermore proposes a plan to offer compensation should there be trouble or a breach of contract, this will considerably increase trust of the customer placing the order.

4. Managing while taking in consideration the conditions and home environment of the SOHO operator
It happens that a SOHO operator may suddenly no longer be able to work, due to a change in the home environment. If one does not manage appropriately, estimating this possibility during regular times, it may lead to delays in deadline and breaches in contract.

5. Becoming sensitive to the needs of SOHO operators who request introductions or placement
There is a high need for obtaining orders for work, but an even higher need for introductions and placement. It would be good to always be aware of SOHO operators' needs in dealing with them, such as offering them web-based matching approaches.

6. Either making an individual business model or following a successful model in order to increase the inflow of orders
As far as the company putting in the order is concerned, supporting SOHOs is irrelevant. There is no relation to the order as long as there is not an individual "sale" that comes of the SOHO's own actions. One approach is to refer a model that has already proved to be successful.

7. Obtaining the trust of the company placing the order by putting in place an approach for information security
Successful SOHO support organizations will put in place approaches in terms of information security in order to earn the trust of companies placing orders.

<In cases of offering background support such as putting in place a work environment>

8. Looking to information exchanges and connections between the public and private sectors
At present, background support for advice and consulting is mainly handled by the public sector (municipalities, chambers of commerce, aggregate corporation and the like). NPO organizations provide courses and seminars as well as opportunities for exchanges, whereas it is mainly the private sectors that handle work introductions, placements and orders. Coordinating between these public and private sectors will ensure the success of SOHO support.

9. Making it possible to collect expenses with regard to providing services
Successful SOHO support organizations are able to collect expenses related to these services. If SOHO operators would not think that it is reasonable to pay, the service is not even worthy of being provided.

10. Using the media effectively
Successful SOHO support organizations can make effective use of media such as newspapers and television, and the effectiveness of the likes of websites, emailing and pamphlets is also high. Media should be used with a full awareness of what to get across and how to get things across.

With regard to No. 8 above, the development of SOHO operator activities through the support of SOHO support organizations is expected to contribute to regional revitalization. Therefore, as far as municipalities and public bodies are concerned, it is hoped that there will be a willingness to coordinate and cooperate positively with private sector support organizations for effective and efficient SOHO support at the regional level.



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